Thursday, October 9, 2008

SOUND OFF: "And, now back to our regularly scheduled program..."


GOOD READS:

What books are sitting on your nightstand?
(Please include title and author)

47 comments:

lulubae said...

I'm reading "My Lobotomy" by Howard Dully. He recounts his own lobotomy at the age of 12 as well as aspects of his childhood and life after.

It's in my line of work (neuropsychologist) so I find first hand accounts fascinating. I'm so glad lobotomies are not allowed anymore.

Road2Madness said...

Ingenix
ICD-9-CM for Physicians Professional Edition 2009

Yes, its for my work. Due to a lot of changes that become effective this month, I have to do a lot of reading to make sure I stay compliant with the federal guidelines.

Any reading (non work related haha) recommendations? :)

Linda said...

I have two great books that I'm reading right now.

"The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch

http://www.thelastlecture.com/

"Wisdom of our Fathers" by Tim Russert

http://www.wisdomofourfathers.com/

Just recently, I finished "Big Russ and Me" by Tim Russert. All are wonderful books.

MonicaW42 said...

Hoaxes by Geoiff Tibballs is the one Im starting tonight. I figured it went along with what happened recently in blogosphere. Just finished Losing It by Valerie Bertinelli. That was actually a good book. It was nice to read where an ex wife didnt slam the ex husband but was brutally honest.

HBIC8u said...

I am desperately trying to read Ellen Degeneres' book but while I think her rambling nature is really funny on tv, she does the same thing in the book and it just doesn't come across as well in print.

I finished The Partner by John Grisham a few weeks ago, and I loved it.

Tyra said...

Quote:
"The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch

I agree, a wonderful book. In that vein (books that make me cry), there's also:

The Woman at the Washington Zoo, by Marjorie Williams. There's also good political writing in it, since she was a Washington journalist.

Linda said...

Actually, I used to keep The Last Lecture in my purse to read when I was waiting for my kids at sports practices except that my eyes would well up and my nose would get red. My boys would either roll their eyes at me or shoot me a dirty look when they'd see me.

merryway said...

The Far Side Gallery (1st one). I'm too busy to start a book right now, but I have to look at something before I go to sleep.

cali-mom said...

I've been reading a Praying Wife by Stormie Omartan. I have been reading it off and on for awhile now.

FIONA said...

The Last Lecture

Glass Castle

MommyZinger said...

Do you want to know something creepy? The last two books I read were by two of, I believe, jhawksgirl's favorite authors.

The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins

and

Stiff:The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach

The book that has been sitting on my nightstand waiting to be read is Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin. The tagline is "One Man's Mission to Promote Peace... One School at a Time"

Guinevere said...

Ooh, The Glass Castle is a good book.

I'm reading Anna Karenina. Last summer I decided I would read one important Russian novel per summer; I started with Crime and Punishment. This year, I didn't even start Anna K. until near the end of August, and it's taking me a while to read it, as you can see. I still have about 150 pages left. It's a good book, though - fairly accessible for something that is both over 100 years old and translated.

Next summer: Dr. Zhivago. I'm working my way up (slowly) to War and Peace.

Mom said...

I'm embarrassed to say the last book I read from cover to cover was The DaVinci Code - LOL! No, I take that back. I did read The Girlfriend's Guide to Pregnancy too!

And ever since my LO was born, the only books sitting on my nightstand are Goodnight Moon, Runaway Bunny and Mommy Loves Me!

Of course, there is a stack of home magazines dog-eared for all the home decor projects I will get to one of these days - yeah right!

Anya said...

I read two books recently by Geraldine Brooks. "March" told mainly from the POV of the father of the Little Women (Alcott) and his experiences during the Civil War. "Year of Wonders" is about a year in a rural English village hit by the plague in the 1600's.

I would recommend both.

cali-mom said...

I read the GF's guide to pregnancy when I was pregnant w/my first..lol

lizziemae7 said...

Well, since I have already started posting on here I may as well respond also :).

I have a bit of a commute, so I listen to a lot of books on CD. Right now it is "He's just not that into you" by Greg Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo. I am also in the middle of "The World is Flat" (by Thomas Friedman) which I am reading for grad school.

As you can tell, I like to have something light when I am also getting through something intense!

FIONA said...

If you liked Glass Castle, read Me and Emma....very good!

Jenn said...

I have "the last lecture" waiting for me to open...

Birdie1483 said...

I'm currently reading "Nordie's at Noon".

It's perfect for Breast Cancer Awareness month. The book is a memoir of four young breast cancer survivors. Their ages range from 24-30 and they give their first hand stories of the entire journey fighting the cancer. I'm about half way through right now and it's VERY good! The only thing that's sad is knowing that two of the authors eventually lost their fight. :(

Team O'Neil said...

The Gold Coast by Nelson DeMille.
I read it years ago but am reading it again because a sequel is coming out. Maybe its again or due to the number of pregnancies, but I have no memory of the book so it's like reading it anew!

MoreCowbell said...

I just got done with some light "chick lit" reading (the "Slightly" books by Wendy Markham). Now I'm reading "Boys of Winter" about he 1980 U.S. Hockey team.

Mom on the Run said...

The Last Lecture--Randy Pausch
a great read. Hoping topersuade my stick-in-the-mud, let's choose romance novels book club to branch out and try this book

Until I Find You--John Irving plodding through this one and not loving it. Quite profane and icky in parts, but I am a John Irving fan so that doesn;t bother me, but the book drags and has no flow at all.

Daughter in Sepia--Isabel Allende. Someone bought it for me around the time my son was born. He is 5, I guess I had better get on this one.

Saint said...

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series (there are presently 9.) Highly recommended.
My New Years' resolution was to read a classic a month. Les Miserables did me in: too long/heavy for summer.

cali-mom said...

Has anyone read anything by Richard Paul Evans? I'm intersted in reading Grace. I've never read anything by him.

GLO said...

Ok, folks. You are making me feel like a ligh-weight. Ha!

I teach high school language arts, so I am constantly reading "classic" literature. For my fun reading, I just finished two great books: When You are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris--totally hilarious, as was his previous books of essays, and Noah by Jacqueline Frank--part of her Nightwalkers series, a paranormal romance.

Guinevere said...

I loved the Sedaris book. But I love all of his books.

My New Years' resolution was to read a classic a month. Les Miserables did me in: too long/heavy for summer.

One a month is pretty ambitious! I'd be scared to read Le Miz, too. I've heard it's wicked long and includes battle scenes (I think?) that go on for hundred of pages. Hey, there were 10 pages in Anna Karenina that dealt with some election or other and I got bored and started skimming.

Guinevere said...

I meant to mention, because someone mentioned Mary Roach - she is similar to Sedaris not in subject matter, but in sense of humor. Or maybe a little closer to Sarah Vowell (who I think has a new book out? I'll have to check...)

I read Roach's "Bonk" a few months ago and really liked it. I'm trying to get the nerve up for "Stiff" - I'm pretty squeamish about death, but the combination of funny and interesting is hard to beat.

LilFireFly said...

Crap. I just lost my comment. I hate when that happens!

Anyway.

I did have David Sedaris's "When You Are Engulfed In Flames" on my nightstand, but I had to return it to the library before I could get into it. Now college books occupy most of my time. I'll have to back to it over break.

GLO said...

Oops--I meant "as were his other books," not was. Lord, I declare I teach language arts then screw up basic grammar!

SamanthaNC said...

Agnes Grey by Ann Bronte is really good- a lesser known classic but a classic just the same. Are any of you familiar with dailylit.com? They have tons of free books to read online, they can email you excerpts on your schedule, when you're ready for the next chapter just click the link, it shows up immediatley- at first I didnt think I would like this method but I wound up loving it. Everyone knows about Pride and Prejudice but I think some are intimidated by it- don't be! At first I thought reading it would feel like a chore- but it wasn't, it was hysterical- the humor is so sarcastic and a bit subtle, but that makes it even funnier!

MonicaW42 said...

Samanthanc, my husband does the dailylit.com and loves it. I just could not get into it like him as I guess Im to old school of wanting the book in my hands LOL.

And this is for the moderators, I love the books we are reading column and was wondering about an "our favorite recipe" one next? That is if it hasnt been done already. Im pretty new here.

Thanks

MrsRef said...

I've recently read all of the Shopaholic Books by Sophia Kinsella (I think that is how you spell it) i also just finished the Undomestic Godess. Will be reading the latest Beverly Lewis book, I am obsessed by Amish culture and she writes some great books.

courtcourt485 said...

I'm currently reading "Bless Your Heart, Tramp and Other Southern Endearments" by Celia Rivenbark. It is by far the funniest book I've ever had the pleasure of reading. I highly recommend it especially if you're from the South. I plan on getting her other titles when I finish this one.

SamanthaNC said...

mrsref:

You might enjoy Wanda Brundstetter's Daughters of Lancaster County series, it's pretty good.

Another series I love is The Smart Chick Mysteries- the first one is The trouble with Tulip, they're great- light hearted, fun reads.

Bayag said...

My book club just finished "Julie and Julia". It's a true story about a woman who tries to cook every recipe in Julia Child's "How to master the art of fine cooking" cookbook. Julie lives in New York and the descriptions of the crazy things that occur in her tiny city apartment are great. She blogged her entire experience. I think the book is being optioned as a movie as well.

Next week is our meeting to discuss the book and we are doing a cooking party. A chef is coming over and we are going to cook one of the meals from the book. I can't wait!

merryway said...

Oh, I didn't think about books on tape. I will be reliving Indian in the Cupboard, Lynne Reid Banks and Little House on the Prairie. I just got them at the lib sale for my little one to listen to while we're in the car. I'm really looking forward to it.

jamesthegirl28 said...

I don't have much time to read books for fun currently (though I hope to get some reading in over Fall Break), but I actually liked Silas Lapham, which we read for my College Seminar. Even though it was written in 1885, the relationships between the characters seem to reflect contemporary themes.

PS. I am bigsis88.

jamesthegirl28 said...

Sorry, I forgot to mention the author: William Dean Howells.

Kuromi said...

For people who wanted a recommendation for their non-work reading list: Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguru. I don't really like his other books that I've read (The Remains Of The Day is probably his most popular), but Never Let Me Go completely deviates from his usual style. It's a first-person narrative of a woman who grew up at an English boarding school--which has a totally f***ed up secret. Part mystery, part sci-fi, part tearjerker romance, pretty nihilistic. I gave it to a friend for his birthday because it's just that special.

Baby Mama said...

I don't own a single book. I really hate to read anything that isn't people or OK Magazine. Ohh and Entertainment Weekly. That's really kinda sad. Maybe Kate's Book will be the first one for me!

MrsRef said...

Samanthanc: I have read one of Wanda Brunsetters books, I can't remember which one and I do own Lancaster Brides but have yet to read it. There is another author whose name escapes me that also writes Amish books. She writes in "series" like Beverly Lewis and the third one just came out. My son is getting married next week so there has been no time for reading!!!!

Mary said...

Current book is Say Goodbye by Lisa Gardner. Love her mystery/thrillers and they are great for escape reading. Interesting to hear about what everyone is reading. I too have made a commitment to myself to read a few of the more classic books. I was thinking of great American authors and realized that I have heard about Hemingway all through my adult life but never read anything by him. Maybe I'll start there!

GLO said...

Mary
I also love Lisa Gardner! I have recently got my dad into her books, since they focus a lot on the mystery/thriller aspects.
If you are wanting to read Hemingway, I must tell you the I found his works to be hit and miss. I recommend starting out with A Farewell to Arms, as it is one of his more palatable books, IMO.

Guinevere said...

glo, I am wary of Hemingway as "The Old Man and the Sea" was my least favorite high school read. One hundred and eighty pages of a guy trying to catch a fish.

So I haven't really read much Hemingway other than that. I do like "A Moveable Feast", which I believe is more or less non-fiction (I read it a long time ago).

erin said...

Guin: A Moveable Feast is one of my favorites, and I thought The Sun Also Rises is closest to that in style and readability. Also congrats on Anna Karenina, because I got through all of like 50 pages. I am not a fan of the Russians and somehow managed to avoid them all the way through college.

I am behind on my reading but am currently in the middle of Lynn Peril's "Pink Think." It is about advertising aimed at women through the 40s-70s. It is really interesting, but I admit I have a tendancy to read around on the internet when I get home. My reading list has been sorely neglected.

SamanthaNC said...

Guinevere-

THANK YOU! The Old Man And The Sea is horrible. I kept thinking, seriously- is this it? Just the struggle to catch this stupid fish? It was torture in high school and it would be torture now, not to mention the ending sucked. Were this a literary blog they would rip me a new one for accusing Hemmingway of "sucking".... Anyhoo. . .

nomoredrama said...

I am just testing...this is OT...I want to see how my posts look with my new image! I hope by making this my image, I'm not jinxing my team. Go Phils!!!!