Thursday, March 5, 2009

15 Things It Took Me Over 50 Years To Learn

There is a cute post on Awesomology written by Dave Barry titled 15 Things It Took Me Over 50 Years To Learn. We know that most of you are not even close to being 50, but were wondering if you would share some of the things that it has taken you most of your lifetime to learn.

16 comments:

SamanthaNC said...

You know that saying, "Not everyone that smiles at you is your friend"? Amen. Especially when it comes to co-workers: I cannot emphasize this enough.

I will never be blonde,no matter how much money I spend trying to get there (much to my husband's chagrin I might add).

TAKE PICTURES- of everything. Especially your pre-baby body lol.

Nina Bell said...

I learned a long time ago never to lick a steak knife.

MrsRef said...

Your children grow up so fast. You need to cherish these moments because they are fleeting. We struggled alot financially when our three were little but we always found fun, inexpensive things to do with them that they remember and talk about to this day. It truly is the little things that count!!!!!

Liza Beth said...

My prof brought this up in our Accounting course as a good lesson on how to handle business meetings. I really really like the one about how someone who is nice to you and rude to a waiter is not a nice person. I have heard that some CEO's pay attention to this in business meetings and I can totally see why. Sometimes people forget that working food service, whether as a barista (which I've done) or waitress, is pretty much a thankless job where you work hard and rarely get the thanks you deserve for the effort you put forth. Its a good reminder to pay attention to how we all treat those we come in contact with.

I love #3-- There is a fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness"!! I will not analyze this further but have to say I totally agree... :).

Eileen said...

It took me that long to learn to be comfortable with myself. It took me that long to stop trying to fit in. It took me that long to stop worrying about the opinion of strangers more than the opinion of loved ones. It took me that long to have the courage of my convictions, to be confident in my beliefs and my values. And it took me almost that long to learn that even though life can be a heartache, you have to learn to enjoy the bright spots that come in between the dark. It took me almost that long to learn what a Blessing my life is.
And I have so many people to be thankful for who have helped me along the way to get here. It's a good place.
And, MrsRef, I couldn't agree with you more! One of my regrets is that I didn't treat my children the way I do my grandchildren now. All you young Moms - enjoy this time, cherish it, it's only a moment in your life, and then it's just a memory.

GLO said...

I have learned that the best sleep at night comes right before the alarm goes off!

Nina Bell said...

It didn't take me 50 years ( am I one of the few people that post here that is over 50?)to learn that family is the most important thing. However, I was probably almost 40 when I realized how smart my parents really are. I realized that the life experiences for their generation probably far exceeded any education I received in college.

Theresa said...

"All things considered, people want to be around friends". I had a program director who said that to our staff about 15 years ago and I try to remember that not everybody has a happy life (or something may be going bad for a person on any given day), and if I can be a friend to a person at any given moment, I try. I say "hi" to anyone I see around me just to make them feel good. They're probably thinking, "who's this wacko?", but 99% of the time, I get a nice conversation with someone I may not see ever again.

themrs said...

i've learned (by 30) that you never know when it might be the last time you see someone you love. always tell them how much you love them and never leave mad.

indianprincess said...

I learned so far the only control you really have is the choices you personally make.

Being an adult doesn't make you responsible.

If your life is struggling then change it.

Geez,I can write all day of things I have learned so far but then it would turn into group therapy.

Saint said...

I am responsible for my own happiness.

People who are mean or whiny are more uncomfortable to be around than people with poor personal hygiene. Don't be a complainer.

The right thing to do is usually the hardest thing to do at the moment, but also the most rewarding in the end.

Apologize when you are wrong. It does a lot to repair damage.

amy said...

i have learned that you MUST leave all your worries/concerns/fears in God's hands...

Guinevere said...

I learned so far the only control you really have is the choices you personally make.

Being an adult doesn't make you responsible.

If your life is struggling then change it.


ITA with this. It can be empowering, too. Sometimes it's just enough to know that you *can* change your circumstances, even if you're not ready to (though you also have to watch out for that becoming a procrastination tactic).

I firmly believe that you need to stop whining about the stuff your parents did to screw you up by the time you're 25 (at least). And even before that, if you want to whine about it, fine, but realize that it's still you who is going to need to do the work to fix it. No one has created a time machine that allows any of us to go back and have a do-over, so you need to move forward.

Anya said...

8. The most destructive force in the universe is gossip.

Halleluiah. The most destructive and often wildly exaggerated or simply fabricated.

Anya said...

Guinevere said...I firmly believe that you need to stop whining about the stuff your parents did to screw you up by the time you're 25 (at least).

On that note, be sure to tell your parents how much you appreciate the things they have done for you when they are still here to hear it. Apologize for the crap you laid on them when you were younger. Cease bringing up their faults in conversations(they have probably already heard those from you many times).

I speak from experience and regret on this one...

Quiltart said...

When it comes to your child, I now know to never say never. I guarantee that if you say "My child will NEVER do that!" ... he will!

Another piece of advice, that I always remember from my dad, who died almost 40 years ago, is to never trust the man who prays the loudest! That has proven itself true to me time and time again.